Spain

_ Animal Fibers

(noun)

Natural fibers that consist of particular proteins. Instances are silk, hair/fur and feathers. They are mostly taken from mammals such as sheep, goats and rabbits with well-known examples such as alpaca, merino, wool, fur and mohair. Animal fibers have different properties, even within a species. Individual animal or natural fibers look different, whereas all synthetic fibers look the same. One eco innovation in animal fiber is the production of cruel-free silk or peace silk.

_ Biodegradable

(adj)

Capable of being broken down (decomposed) rapidly by the action of microorganisms. Biodegradable substances include food scraps, cotton, wool, wood, human and animal waste, manufactured products based on natural materials.

_ CCO (Country Of Origin)

(noun)

Country of manufacture, production, or growth where an article or product comes from. There are differing rules of origin under various national laws and international treaties.

_ Carbon Footprint

(noun)

Sum of all emissions of CO2 (carbon dioxide), which were induced by your activities in a given time frame.

_ Carbon Neutral

(noun)

Carbon neutrality, or having a net zero carbon footprint, refers to achieving net zero carbon emissions by balancing a measured amount of carbon released with an equivalent amount sequestered or offset, or buying enough carbon credits to make up the difference.

_ Carbon Offsets

(noun)

A unit of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e) that is reduced, avoided, or sequestered to compensate for emissions occurring elsewhere.

_ Cashmere

(noun)

The fine (dehaired) undercoat fibers produced by a Cashmere goat (Capra hircus laniger).

_ Certification

(noun)

Process intended to determine if a fashion product meets minimum quality standards. This confirmation is often provided by some form of external review, education, or assessment done by a government body or non-governmental organization. Common textile certificates are the GOTS, the EU Ecolabel, the Fair Trade label and the IVN Best.

_ Conventional Cotton

(noun)

Inorganic cotton. One of the largest pesticide-dependent crops in the world, accounting for approximately 25% of the world's insecticide usage and 10-15% of the world's pesticide usage. Conventional cotton farmers most commonly implement: genetically modified seeds that are treated with fungicides and pesticides to increase a crop's yield; herbicides to control weeds; pesticides to kill or deter pests; and fertilizer to provide nutrition to highly degraded soil.

_ Cotton

(noun)

Cotton is one of agriculture’s most water-intensive and pest-sensitive crops, often grown in semi-arid and water-scarce areas. The environmental and social impacts are therefore widespread and need to be addressed.

_ Craft/artisan

(noun)

Products that have been made using artisan skills that involves making things by hand, which preserve the perpetuation of ancestral traditions.

_ Crepe

(noun)

Silk, wool, or synthetic fiber fabric with a distinctively crisp, crimped appearance.

_ Custom

(noun)

Also called demi-couture or made-to-order. This is a way of encouraging quality and “slow fashion” over mass-produced disposable fashion.

_ Elastane

(noun)

A synthetic fiber characterized by its ability to revert to its original shape after being stretched.

_ Environmental Impact

(noun)

According to the resolution of the National Council for Science and the Environment, the environmental impact is the change of the physio-chemical and biological environment caused by any form of matter or energy resulting from human activities. These activities, directly or indirectly, affect the health, safety, and welfare of the population; social and economic activities; the aesthetic conditions and health of the environment; and quality of resources.

_ Ethical

(adj)

Pertaining to or dealing with morals or the principles of morality; pertaining to right and wrong in conduct.

_ Ethical Fashion

(noun)

For almasanta, the word "ethical" comprises all or at least one of these four characteristics, namely the environment, social values, transparency and the preservation of traditional handicraft techniques.

_ Ethically Produced

(adj)

Ethical fashion is fashion that has been produced with respect for people and the environment. Although there are existing certifications for Organic and Fair Trade, we want to encourage companies who are taking significant action but don’t qualify for certification. This might include companies producing locally or on small scales in developed countries, who might not qualify for Fair Trade certification or companies working with farmers to transition to sustainable crops but who might not yet qualify as Organic.

_ Fair Trade

(noun)

Trading partnership, based on dialogue, transparency and respect, that seeks greater equity in international trade. It contributes to sustainable development by offering better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers

_ Fair Trade Certified

(noun)

An organized movement that promotes standards for international labor (such as reasonable work hours, no child labor, the right to unionize, a fair living wage), environmentalism, and social policy in areas related to production of goods. Fair Trade focuses on exports from developing countries to developed countries. Some Fair Trade certification organizations include: FLO www.fairtrade.net, IFAT www.ifat.org, TransFair (Canada and US) www.transfairusa.org and www.transfair.ca.

_ GOTS (Global Organic Textile Standard)

(noun)

The worldwide leading textile processing standard for organic fibers, including ecological and social criteria, backed up by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain.

_ Linen

(noun)

A hard-wearing fabric woven from the spun fibres of flax.

_ Locally Made

(adj)

Products that have been made in an specific area or country respecting its strict production regulations.

_ Lyocell

(noun)

A cellulose fiber obtained by an organic solvent spinning process where: "organic solvent" means a mixture of organic chemicals and water, and "solvent spinning" means dissolving and spinning without formation of a derivative.

_ Natural Fibers

(noun)

Also called natural yarns, are obtained directly from nature and are made into fabrics through mechanical processes of twisting, cleaning and finishing. They can be obtained from fruit, leaves, bark and wood. The main textile plants are: the Cotton crop, the Jute (to make ropes), Flax (stem with rigid filaments), Sisal and Rami (both similar to Flax).

_ Organic

(adj)

Natural fibers that have been grown without any pesticides and other toxic materials, preserving the health of humans and the environment. The process of organic growth can be certified by various organizations.

_ Organic Cotton

(noun)

Cotton fibre which has been grown according to the principles and rules of organic agriculture. These rules are very strict and are defined by a law from the European Union. Organic agriculture uses no synthetic pesticides or fertilizers, and no Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

_ Polyamide

(noun)

Synthetic fabric that contains sweat-wicking and water-repelling properties that make it an ideal material for outerwear and sports clothing.

_ Recycled

(adj)

Anything that has been made from already existing materials, fabrics, metals or fibers. These are often reclaimed from previously made clothing and accessories and reworked into new ones. Fibers can also be re-purposed from pre-existing fabric, re-spun and reused for new garments.

_ Responsable Consumereism

(noun)

The act of consuming products and services while taking into account the impact and consequences for the environment and the society at large.

_ Silk

(noun)

Natural protein fiber. The protein fiber of silk is composed mainly of fibroin and is produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons. The best-known silk is obtained from the cocoons of the larvae of the mulberry silkworm Bombyx more reared in captivity.

_ Standards

(noun)

A variety of textile standards exist, some of them apply globally, some nationally, like GOTS, Oeko-Tex ® Standard 100 or Naturtextil IVN certified BEST.

_ Supima Cotton®

(noun)

Supima is the cashmere of cotton. It has an especially long fiber which gives Supima unusual qualities of strength, softness and color, but it's also grown 100% in the USA. "Pima" is a generic term for extra-long staple cotton grown in the US, Australia, Peru and a few other countries. It was once called American-Egyptian cotton, but was renamed to honor the Pima Indians who were growing cotton in Sacaton Arizona. "Supima" is 100% American grown Pima cotton which, we think, is the best cotton on the market.

_ Sustainable

(adj)

The quality of not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources, and thereby supporting long-term ecological balance.

_ Tencel

(noun)

Fiber naturally derived from cellulose which is extracted from managed trees. It is one of the softest and most elegant fibers available.

_ Transparency

(noun)

Building sustainable relationships throughout the supply chain in order to create quality products that have minimal negative impact on the environment and human beings.

_ Vegan

(adj)

Products that have been made without the use of leather or animal tissue products. Examples are shoes and bags made from “vegetal leather” using Amazonian rubber instead of animal skins or other recycled or man-made materials.

_ Vintage/Second-Hand

(adj)

Vintage is a generic term for new or second hand garments created in the period from the 1920’s to 1975. However, the term is often used more generally for second-hand clothes or up-cycled clothes (second-hand clothes that have been given a new life through some sort of customization).

_ Viscose Yarn

(noun)

Semi-synthetic fiber. The latter is produced by treating dissolving pulp with aqueous sodium hydroxide and carbon disulfide which is used to spin the viscose rayon fiber.

_ Water Footprint

(noun)

The amount of fresh water utilized in the production or supply of the goods and services used by a particular person or group.